Another January 12

January 12 again, the anniversary of the devastating Haiti earthquake. Rather than post a long, hand-wringing lament, I figured I would be positive and post some photos from my own visit to Haiti last year.

Some of the pictures do show rubble and destruction, but others show a brighter, livelier more hopeful side…through the eyes of a group of school-aged artists.

Port-au-Prince cathedral, destroyed in the earthquake, 12 January 2010

Port-au-Prince cathedral, destroyed in the earthquake, 12 January 2010

The tap-tap, a handpainted, repurposed school bus, is the standard form of transport in Port-au-Prince.

The tap-tap, a handpainted, repurposed school bus, is the standard form of transport in Port-au-Prince.

Goats wander between mausoleums in Port-au-Prince's largest cemetery.

Goats wander between mausoleums in Port-au-Prince’s largest cemetery.

A partially re-tiled mosaic on the side of a gallery in the seaside town of Jacmel.

A partially re-tiled mosaic on the side of a gallery in the seaside town of Jacmel.

Entrance to the Atis Rezistans art collective in downtown Port-au-Prince.

Entrance to the Atis Rezistans art collective in downtown Port-au-Prince.

Sculptures inside the Atis Rezistans art collective. The "heads" on the small spirit sculptures come from actual skulls found in the Port-au-Prince cemetery. The artists tend to think of this as recycling rather than desecration.

Sculptures inside the Atis Rezistans art collective. The “heads” on the small spirit sculptures come from actual skulls found in the Port-au-Prince cemetery. The artists tend to think of this as recycling rather than desecration.

André Eugène, pictured in his gallery-workshop, is one of the cofounders of the museum. He and his colleagues train dozens of young artists. He dreams of establishing a boarding school on the chaotic Port-au-Prince worksite.

André Eugène, pictured in his gallery-workshop, is one of the cofounders of the museum. He and his colleagues train dozens of young artists. He dreams of establishing a boarding school on the chaotic Port-au-Prince worksite.

On the day I visited, some of the younger artists were hard at work putting a new door on a gallery and storage centre.

On the day I visited, some of the younger artists were hard at work putting a new door on a gallery and storage centre.

Sarah-Jean Valris, 13, shows off a work in progress, a beaded flag (drapeau brodé). The flags are a traditional Haitian art form inspired by the ritual art of vodou. Sarah-Jean's uncle, Georges Valris, is one of the country's best-known drapeau brodé artists.

Sarah-Jean Valris, 13, shows off a work in progress, a beaded flag (drapeau brodé). The flags are a traditional Haitian art form inspired by the ritual art of vodou. Sarah-Jean’s uncle, Georges Valris, is one of the country’s best-known drapeau brodé artists.

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About msmarguerite

Young Quebec City-based freelance journalist. once and future nomad. I blog about life, about travel, about things I notice and every so often about work. I enjoy language learning, singing, swing dancing, skating and...other stuff, sometimes. My heart is somewhere in East Africa, Haiti or Eastern Europe. English, français, русский, malo slovensko, un poco de espanol, um pouco de português ndiga ikirundi, mwen ap aprann kreyòl...
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